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of congressmen who were worried about government spending. the committee chairman is congressman jim jordan. what do you want to do? cut for people of? >> no, we want to help them get to a better life. what you need to do is create programs that actually help people get to a better life. john: ever done before. >> you do it by not waving the work requirement like this administration did. you -- john: to be fair, they have not totally waived a work requirement. they let some states experiment. >> they also let some states not have a work requirement and there sang were not going to require that one key element that helps people get to the american dream, experiences. did the job. that is what we want to see. that key ingredient to accomplish anything that we all learn. john: how? that was already in the original welfare reform act? we have a new welfare reform act, updated version. >> for trying to get a handle on all of the social welfare spending the federal government does. estimates are 600 billion the year when you factor in medicaid and the 70 plus different programs that are out there. john
to be for years and years that the government gave money to the banks in the form of guarantees, we would guarantee 90% of the bank loan that the banks made to the students. set ago is side the reserve in case the money didn't get repaid. it turned out the price of the loans went down and the default rate went down once you made the rates down, people could afford to pay it. we started letting the students to pay it at fixed percentage of north carolina. nobody had to drop out of school because they borrowed money. [cheering and applause] what the president did because he knew we needed more people to get college degrees the cost of college was killing people. we dropped from zenned in the world to 16th. the percentage of the people graduated from college until we are almost first in a percentage that go. it's because the cost and people thinking that can never pay it back. it's a big deal. what happened when president obama and the congress adopted the so-called direct student loan program and allowed students to pay that money back at the fixed percent of their income for twenty years.
this is a roundtable. >> i know you did not know enough about government. >> may be in it -- instead of saying i am scared to face you, i am facing you right now. forward and we will see if there are more debate later on. >> the issue of government assistance and who pays for them and receive them. the city recorded a video at mitt romney -- the secret recorded video of mitt romney at a private fund-raiser. let's take a look. >> 47% -- >> in 2010, 38.5% of texans filing a retirement paid no income tax. there is no complete data on who get government assistance but last year, 24% of households get social security. almost 14% debt retirement income. 5% get disability benefits and almost 14%, food stamps. >> do you think east texans are victims of believe government has a responsibility to care for them? >> of course not. i agree with mitt romney when he said is, there were poorly phrased? there is a difference. part of the philosophy of president obama and this administration is trying to get as many americans as possible dependent on government so the democrats can stay in power in perpetuity. the r
, recognized by both political parties as turning point. a change debate about the role of government, free market to the future trajectory of our nation. in that debate, campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bytes, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the miss -- mist of this a serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking a
a small business. we have strayed far from the principles of limited government. our government taxes and spends out of control and our civil liberties are constantly under attack. we can fix it, but we need to get government back into its cage. >> our final opening statement is from jeff flake. >> good to be here. two days ago, cheryl and i received a wonderful phone call from my son ryan and forming as we are grandparents. aidan was born into a wonderful family, but he was born into $50,000 of debt. his share of the federal debt we all hold. that is why the stakes in this election are so high. we have to have somebody who understands fiscal discipline. that has been my record in the house of representatives, where i fought my own leadership on issues like earmarks. they punish me for it, but i kept at it and we do not have earmarks any more. that is the kind of attitude i will take to the united states senate. my opponent have a great rÉsume. but a great resume is not a plan. he has been running for a year now and we do not know where he stands on the major issues of the day. we ha
for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming. please take this money and bring it back to washington. he said, go back to washington and tell them they need a reality check. we are tired of the overspending and the taxing and taking more money out of the economy. there are real challenges here. i used to live here. i worked and i lived over there. i understand. many businesses are hurting right now. regulatory tax uncertainty is the biggest challenge they have. >> tomorrow will be the one- year anniversary of senator brown's first vote against 22,000 jobs here in massachusetts. i hope everybody who knows someone who is unemployed, every business who would like to see those paychecks to spend in their shops, will remember that. that is how we jump-start the economy. we get work that needs to be done, and we put people back to work. the bill would have cost millionaires
voted for him. i understand why you turned away from the last labour government. this government took power in difficult economic times. it was a country still coming to terms with the financial crisis. a financial crisis that has afflicted every country round the world. i understand why you were willing to give david cameron the benefit of the doubt. long think we've had enough to make a judgment. long enough to make a judgement because they turned a recovery into the longest double dip recession since the war. because there are more people looking for work for longer than at any time since the last time there was a conservative government. and here is the other thing, what about borrowing? borrowing. the thing they said was their number one priority. this year borrowing is rising not falling. let me just say that again. borrowing the thing they said was the most important priority, the reason they were elected. it is rising not falling. not because there hasn't been pain and tax rises and cuts affecting every family in this country. not because they didn't want to cut it borrowing.
wood told the house of representatives oversight and government reform committee, get this, the consulate in benghazi never had the forces it needed to protect itself. never. >> the security in benghazi was a struggle and remained a struggle through my time there. the situation remained uncertain and reports from some libyans indicated it was getting worse. diplomat security remains weak. in april there was only one u.s. diplomatic security agent stationed there. they struggled to obtain additional personnel but was never able to attain the numbers he felt comfortable with. >>shepard: a former state department regional security officer in libya testified, as well. here is what he said, that the united states could not count on lib jab security forces to help with security adequately. >> the libyan temporary government was unable to extend security assets to diplomatic missions in the ways we are expecting to see around the world. we could not rely on the libyan government for security, intelligence, and law enforcement help to identify emerging threats or to ask them for as
enduring presence will be, and we're working on that right now both internal to our government, but also with our nato allies. so we're trying to determine based on the agreements made in lisbon and then reinforced in chicago about what this long-term commitment will be, and it's scoped against several missions, one of which is counterterror, another of which is continuing to train and advise at some level. another is to enable other agencies of government to do their job in afghanistan. and so as we determine how to, what we'll need to accomplish those missions based on the growth of the afghan security forces, sometime early in 2013 we'll come up with a number that will define our enduring presence. and then we'll take what we have there now, which is 68,000 u.s. and about 30, 34,000 coalition partners, and we'll establish a glide slope to get from where we are to where we're going to be. and the important point is that in that question is i want to reinforce that our objectives remain both sound and achievable. as for the insider threat, as i mentioned in my prepared remarks, the insi
around the world. we could not rely on the libyan government for security, inlligence, and law enforcement help to identify emerging threats or to ask them rise itin tohecotern a private interview, that a state department official who oversees diplomatic security wanted to keep the number of "aicyoty personnel in benghazi dahege the mmeecg om missions around the globe and a constant struggle. >> i worked closely with more than 275 facilities around the world determining the right it itee agogriorch o. evolving process that i appreciate and understand from my own time on the ground a a diplomatic security for. >>shepard: she testified that she has never visited lya. stdemeeld pon t ak le baorstsdhree others. the officials say they never concluded that the attack grew from a protest. never. no protest over a low-budget anti-islam video. you mayeca te unedta ss tthit onfll ple s ,nily cme loudly and over and over and over and over again that extremists hijacked protests over the video. there were no protests. the state departments coming thosssas wee f cag wendell is at the white
government. our government taxes and spends out of control and our civil liberties are constantly under attack. we can fix it, but we need to get government back into its cagae. >> our final opening statement is from jeff flake. >> good to be here. two days ago, cheryl and i received a wonderful phone call from my son syan and forming as we are grandparents. aidan was born into a wonderful family, but he was born into $50,000 of debt. his share of the federal debt we all hold. that is why the stakes in this election are so high. we have to have somebody who understands fiscal discipline. that has been my record in the house of representatives, where i fought my own leadership on issues like earmarks. they punish me for it, but i kept at it and we do not have earmarks any more. that is the kind of attitude i will take to the united states senate. my opponent have a great rÉsume a. but a great resonate is not a plan. he has been running for a year now and we do not know where he stands on the major issues of the day. we have a choice in this election. we can elect somebody who does not h
hollywood, big government, big journalism, and big peace, p, e, a, c, e. he became a big player what is come to be called the new media including work as editor on "the drudge report" website and yes the "huffington post". bull buckley didn't dwell in the past but he believed we should and could learn from it. he was fascinated by the rise of the new media and encouraged conservatives to become involved in it as he had in the old media. he didn't live to see it come to full fruition and andrew left us too soon for him to become a greater influence than he already has. a tribute to him that his web sites and work endure. it is my pleasure as the winner of last year's william f. buckley, jr., award to present this year's award posthumously to andrew breitbart. may he rest in peace. [applause] may he rest in peace and may his legacy live on. accepting the award is oars son dean, susie's father and with him is alley mills dean. ♪ . >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. you may remember me. i formally went on the screen, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some fr
are approached or anything happens in your professional lives with the united states government that you have any questions about, please come to this committee. we take the work of whistle- blowers and people who give testimony very seriously. you have been critical to bring out things which would not have -- which would not have come out to. i will close with two comments. that i took away from today. he did not produce security at -- you do not reduce security at the -- the same time as you are increasing hazardous duty pay. it does not make sense. i have not heard that question asked and answered. i only heard that it occurred. i think the state department to take away from today and understanding that that sends a message that says, we will pay you for the risk. we will not pay to have you made safer. that is the impression that anyone would get if you reduce the staffing below recommendations or request an increase the pay. i do not think the men and women who service overseas want. i know the compensation for hardship is important, but safety comes first. i have the marine fellow who work
. presenting a summary, two of the jurists said israeli violations were impossible without u.s. government backing. >> the tribunal finds that israel's ongoing colonial settlement expansion, its racial separatism policies, as well as its violent militarism would not be possible without the united states economic military and diplomatic support. >> the russell tribunal session here in new york will give us the opportunity to further persuade people who believe in justice and equality and peace in this country that they should join the campaign for solidarity with palestinian people and palestinian freedom. the ousted president mohamed nasheed after he ignored a summons to appear in court. he is facing charges of illegally ordering the arrest of a judge appointed by gayoom, who ruled the maldives for 30 years before nasheed became its first democratically elected president in 2008. nasheed was ousted earlier this year in what he described as a coup at gunpoint by gayoom's supporters. nasheed is well known internationally for his activism on the issue of global warming, which he says threaten
to suggest that the government didn't know what it was doing and could have saved the lives of those men? >> well, ashleigh, it depends who you ask. if you ask democrats, it's the former. this is a political stunt to damage president obama just weeks before the election. but the republican chair of the committee, daniel issa, is saying listen, something went wrong, we need to get to the bottom of this. and indeed you're going to hear today from senior security officials that were posted in benghazi in months leading up to the attack, not on the day of the attack, posted in libya that say, look, we did send messages to the state department asking for additional secity, asking for security teams that were on the ground to be extended beyond their mandate over the summer. and so these requests were apparently either denied or not responded to. and so you'll hear from these security officials, and you'll hear from charlene lamb, a deputy assistant secretary who a lot of these requests went to. and i think a lot of people are wondering why she didn't respond to them, why, perhaps, she denied
with president obama's health plan, that it wasn't strong enough or that it's government takeover of health care, you can disdegree with him on taxes or whatever, but this is against him personally and trying to destroy and discredit him personally. the obama hate machine. and it's not just fox news. it's out there because of a couple of people that most americans have never heard of, the famous koch brothers, charles -- now-famous, charles and david coke. david koch. and, again, we've seen corporate-sponsored attacks against presidents before, particularly, and i outline two of them, franklin delano roosevelt. by the way, with him it was the dupont brothers, and there were free of those at the -- three of those at the time. formed the liberty league to deny fdr a second term. and then with bill clinton, of course; was richard melon safe who funded all the investigations that led to paula jones and on and on, and the articles in the american spectator. but nothing compared to the money and the organization that we've seen on the part of charles and david koch who are the heads of koch industries
daily sacrifice to protect our government. but the government accountability board said the problem is isolate they have done their best to fix it >> 26 of the 851 local clerks who missed the deadline and we have a number of redundancies in the system. they got it in a timely manner and so they can mark it to get it counted. >> gab said electronic ballots cut transmission time in half and in most cases ballots are delivered . now the responsibility rests with a voters to get the ballot sent in on time . the lieutenant governor who was on "fox and friends" this morning is very worried. >> it is unacceptable that our military men and women, who allow us to sleep peacefully with our little kids at home and at night might be denied the opportunity to choose their next commander-in-chief. >> mitt romney campaign might fall suits elsewhere. nothin is imminent but we are monitoring other states and seriously considering filing a suit in vermont but the department of the justice filed their own suit. but there is only 24 days until the election and not much time to get it settled. >> not mu
to ensure that yes come the government is very much pro-life and that it would support legislation that would restrict abortion. this has all open up a bunch of new questions, some of which make them up at tonighttomorrow night's presidential debate and could come up in the second one. we are following this and we will see where it goes. jenna: it might be interesting if it comes up in the townhall today. we will be watching for that as well. reporter: it could be, maybe someone will bring up. we appreciated it always. you never know really what questions will be asked and it really does show the priority of voters in what questions and issues they want the candidates to address. jon: also interesting to hear what chris christie might say. we are continuing to monitor the next presidential debate. my next guest says that the president's performance in denver forced a major strategy change for the obama party. charlie gasparino joins us live. you are talking about the four letter word liar, right? reporter: everyone across the spectrum, even msnbc determined that barack obama had cl
agency. >> the government does a great job at cleaning things up. >> absolutely. >> they write extensively on green regulators. >> rivers are not catching fire any more. that's a great thing. >> we go through public opinion in those years and even as the nations air and water were getting cleaner american people were getting increasingly worried about the environment. why is that do you think? >> we went from not worrying at all in the 40s and 50s to possibly worrying too much or at least worrying about the wrong thing. >> blame that on environmental doomsday books beginning with silent spring by marine biologist rachel carson. a run away best seller it envisions humans gradually destroying the world by among other things the indiscreme nim use of chemicals. >> long board credits silent spring with launching the modern environmental movement. that movement showed it's strength by getting william russell house the first epa chief to ban the pdc. they were followed by increasing restrictions worldwide of the pesticide over the next 30 years. >> long headed long board said because
years, we have had revenues coming into the federal government at a level around 15% of gdp. that is a 60-year low. since 1960, we have never had a balanced budget in a year when revenues were less than 18% of gdp. in 2001, the last year we had a surplus, revenues were at 19.5% of gdp. we have a revenue problem. we need tax reform to solve it. some on the left have suggested corporate tax reform could be a source for new revenue but here i disagree. to preserve our international competitiveness, it is imperative we seek to reduce the corporate rate from 35% and do it on a revenue-neutral basis. this will boost growth and encourage more companies to reinvest in the united states. corporate tax reform, under the leadership of chairman baucus senator hatch should be treated separately from our attempt to get a handle on the deficit. but when it comes to the individual side of the code, our approach must be different. in this part of reform, the new money we collect from broadening the tax base cannot all be applied to prepare -- to reducing rates or else we will not get enough
to secretary of state hillary clinton claiming that quote, multiple u.s. federal government officials confirmed to the committee that prior to september 11th attack, the u.s. mission in libya made repeated requests for increased security in benghazi. the mission in libya, however, was denied these resources by officials in washington. the fbi arrived in benghazi wednesday, three weeks after the attack, but spent only about 12 hours there. we're back with dan henninger, and also wall street board, matt comiskey and bret, foreign policy has said to be a big edge for president obama. is that edge eroding maust of libya and the middle east. >> i think it is eroding and time the president to get credit for policies that don't exist. >> there's focus on the kind of bureaucratic blunders made both prior didded especially prior to the attack and not sufficiently securing our diplomatic security there. >> it's an important issue? >> it's a democratic issue. >> paul: don't we have to keep our diplomatic issues secure? >> yes, but it's not the largest issue. i think these congressman, darrell issa will be
electronically it was as good as if it had been printed by the government printing office, it delivered over here and then distributed. there were other things we did, mandatory wed casting -- web castin, really pushing companies to do that. as part of the effort to make electronic texts available in serve as a place where we could measure our own efforts to comply with the three day rule. we traded a centralized portugal for text coming up in the coming week. for all of this year that has been online for stuff coming to the floor there a lot of good work from our colleagues that were in the clerk's office. i would expect that would come on line for commit these early next year. that work is ongoing. looking at the next congress, i do not see the need for a whole lot of rule changes on this front. we're still in the process of the rule changes we made last time and evaluating their impact on what we're doing here in terms of our day to day legislative business. i think individual committees are trying to work really hard to make themselves more transparent. i know we are at the rules committee. i
affirm that it is ok for a public institution, whether it's government body handing out contracts or student or college admitting students, that it's ok for them to try to make sure that their student body looks like the state looks. they should if at all practical use factors on race and economic disadvantage, are you the first in your family to go to college? but if you see public institutions where the numbers of students dramatically different then the state population, i think it's an indication of challenge and problem that we have to try to solve. i strongly believe the diversity of our commonwealth is the strength, diversity of our nation is a strength and we ought to see diversity in our public bodies. >> mr. allen? >> i'm in some agreement with tim's expressions. i'm someone who's in favor of affirmative recruitment and i think everyone regardless of background ought to have an equal opportunity to compete and succeed. i would not want to deny people an opportunity based oni would e an opportunity based on race regardless of what their race is. while affirmative recruitm
does now. if you think about liberia it was the women coming together and it was without government sank and without our own encouragement. so it needs to be a true component in our foreign policy. we need to see this as fundamental and act is if it's fundamental. and of course in afghanistan, you know, i mean thanks to the feminist majority that was concern about the women in afghanistan but i can tell you the administration was saying it's their culture. i think maybe what happens to women is culture, what happens to men is politics. you can't change that. and we now have the very deep and important problem of how we leave and what happens. [applause]. >> i invite any of our members of the press and the feminist media who have joined us today to also jump in. it's a question now about girls and young women who want to make a difference for women's rights and in feminism, do you have advice for them? >> my advice is don't listen to me. really, listen to yourself. that's the whole idea. we're here to support you and learn from you. no relationship is unequal including between young
command of international affairs and his insight in the workings of government and other actors. with these gentlemen we are poised for an illuminating conversation about the world, the future and the revenge of geography. bobbit and david, over to you. >> i think you're probably not supposed to see the serious moderator by but i love this book. it's ridiculous how many yell will post its i've put in it. i'm not just doing it to flatter the teacher because i really like it and i want to try to walk the audience through this or have him what the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment. you said my reporting of for three decades convinced me we need to recover the sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age's when they dash across the continent which allow us to talk a lot of the distinguished columnist tom friedman labeled a flat world. instead level introduced readers to the decidedly unfashionable figures to push up against the notion that geography no longer matters. i want to ask you to start with the basics of
people to show the same type of thing had would be required to get government assistance and get on an airplane and try government building and is actually a common sense move to ensure we maintain the integrity -- >> the basic right of an american isn't to fly, is it? >> i don't understand your question. >> your basic american right in certain things is to be able to vote. >> i don't understand how -- entering a government building, getting government benefits, things like that, it is a common sense thing to say hey, if you are going to come in to a voting booth to claim you are somebody, we would like to actually use a common sense -- >> it is a -- to get an i.d. and certain cases considered to be a poll tax. poll tax is unconstitutional. is a poll tax constitutional or unconstitutional? >> poll tax would be. i don't understand -- that's like saying to drive on a road is a poll tax -- you have to get a license to enter a government building there is a poll tax because you have to show a photo i.d. to get government been pits a poll tax because you have to show i.d. to get those
? is there a point where the federal government seizes control of the project? dr. ruiz? >> thank you for bringing this up, because it really brings very pleasant memories of my father taking me there to fish and havin picnics with the family. now we're seeing dead fish and a stink that is unbearable. and this is somewhere where congresswoman has failed to deliver. she continues to talk a big game. she promised in her first election that she would fix the sea. 14 years later it has not been fixed. i don't know what stippings more, a broken promise or the sultan sea. in fact, this is a great opportunity right now for us to revive that sultan sea so that we can have it as a hot spot for tourism, so that other children can fish with their fairs, so we can develop geothermal energy and boost our economy. and the way we're going to go about doing it is public/private partnerships with local input and authority so that we can come together and stop this bickering and attack talk and all this other stuff that congresswoman bono mack is so adept at and skilled, but really come up with some problem-solving
objects to. there is no role for the government to be sort of people by race. >> the university of texas of austin's has what? guest: they say the supreme court has endorsed education and diversity as a compelling goal for the government and an exception to the usual rule that the government should not be classified people by race. it is true, and a 5-4 decision, the supreme court said that, but the key vote, sandra day o'connor, has retired, replaced by a more conservative judge, samuel alito, so in that they give us a new result. >> what is the result of this, who will hear it, who will decide? guest: only eight justices will decide. elena kagan is reduced from oregon and the case as a former u.s. solicitor general. it is a good bet the four more conservative justices, if not to strike an entirely, will limit the use of race. the three more liberal ones will go the other way. as usual, anthony kennedy will hold the deciding vote. on the one hand, he has said there have been some positive things about the importance of diversity. on the other hand, he has never voted to make sure that a
to go up again. our information services and the government. gentlemen, we are out of time. we appreciate your time on the "washington journal." house of representatives is coming into session. a pro forma session. there will be no real business done today. thank you for being with us. enjoy your weekend. book tv begins on c-span 2 at 8:00 a.m. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. october 12, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable scott desjarlais to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. sage: the prayer will be offered by the guest chap lip, dr. david r-l r. roberry institute of the religion of the church of jesus christ of latter-day saints, washington, d.c. the chaplain: let us pray. dear father in heaven, humbly we bow before thee, recognizing our dependence upon thee and seeking thy guidance in the proceedings of this, the people's house. father, we express profound gratitude that thou has established our constitution by the hands
to the cyber threat requires the right policies and organizations across the federal government. for the past year, the department of defense has been working closely with other agencies to understand where are the lines of responsibility when it comes to cyber defense? where do we draw those lines? how do those responsibilities get executed? as part of that effort, the department is now finalizing the most comprehensive change to our rules of engagement in cyberspace in seven years. the new rules will make clear that the department has a responsibility not only to be thin d.o.d.'s networks -- to networks, but to defend the nation and our natural -- national interests in cyberspace. these new rules makes the department more agile and provides us with the ability to confront major threats quickly. to execute these responsibilities, we must have strong organizational structures in place. three years ago, the department took a major step forward by establishing the united states cyber command. under the leadership of a four start officer who also served as the director of the national security a
, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of them designed to help children and the poor. >> the bombing in oakland the city has focused renewed attention on the rhetoric that's been coming from the right and those who cater to angry white men. although no one is suggesting right wing greater jocks approve of violence, the extent to which the approach fosters violence is being questioned by many observers. >> i don't think i think jesse jones defenders here. >> not me. i think you have to be worried about that's what's going on in the good lord's mind, because if there's retributive justice, he will get aids from a transfusion or one of his grandchildren will get it. >> it finally dawned on me that the person can start has reminded me of facially all this time was heinrich himmler, including his glasses. >> this advice, mr. bush, shut the hell up, good night and good luck. >> they have waved signs liking president obama to hitler and the devil can raise questions about whether he was really born in this country, falsely accuse him of planning to set up dead panels -- deat
and whether they matter. first, the world section of usa today, testimony before the house government and oversight committee -- recovered yesterday's hearing. if your interested in watching, go to our web site c-span.org to get more. in the "washington times" this morning -- these e-mails were obtained by the washington times. and an update on a story we told you about yesterday, a high court hearing oral arguments about the affirmative action case. the university of texas at austin being challenged by abigail fisher about how they admit their students. this is what richard wolfe and mary beth write -- if you are interested in the audio of the oral arguments, it will be released by the court on friday after 1:00 p.m. c-span.org to find out when we will be airing that on friday. jimmy is an independent scholar. where are you from? caller: north carolina. host: what do you think about the vice-presidential debate? caller: well, i think the vice presidential debate matters. the politics have become like a consumer item in how we package the product and substance does not really matter.
in return is by and large good government. and we do find it. we have research and studies that have gone into that. there's also the question of corporate money which was pointed out, everybody but super pacs would be funded by corporate money. that is cloudy not the case. it's almost all individual money. albeit from very wealthy individuals. there's not a strong reason to think is mostly corporate money, especially not large corporate publicly traded corporations. what we have to ultimately is a couple of questions. there's one question, which is is a good or bad habits more open deregulate system where everybody can kind of play the game? the second question is the one kim keeps trying to drag us back to is how much of this do we need more disclosure of this because some of this activity is not disclosed? i will note that 501(c)(4) organizations have always been able to participate in politics and it never had to disclose their donors. i take, sort of my starting point, my perception of the government better have a darn good reason before source keeping a database in which it catalogs
of this week, the tax cliff that comes off the spending, the taxes and the more government bureaucracy is exactly what the democrats are selling. this has caused a hiewmg impact on employment, we have a lack of jobs and the future that lies ahead is very bleak, economically. republicans offer a sound plan, not just to cut taxes but to get us back to work and our candidates differ with every single democrat on this issue, i think we will do just fine. >> shannon: we mentioned the key states where you are watching, ohio, california, massachusetts, can you give us insight maybe into the seats that are leaning one way or the other and you are dwoaing a lot of resources to make sure it falls into your column? >> did you mention, a race in massachusetts. one of the top republican challengers that we have against john teenager neboston. richard is doing a fabulous job. he has ethically challenged the american people, not only want and need honest members of congress, but i think we will win that seat. as you look across the country, republicans are on offense, all across the country, against
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